After 30,000 KM – We Still Love the Toyota Landcruiser.

Kylie is without doubt a Landcruiser girl...!
Recently, we were driving home along Victoria’s Goulburn Valley Highway after spending a relaxing weekend with friends in Gough’s Bay, near Lake Eildon. For anyone unfamiliar with this road, it is a fairly typical B grade highway in Victoria, with a single lane in each direction and dotted with occasional overtaking opportunities, tight sweeping bends and varying gradients. During winter, this road is packed with skiers heading up to Mt Buller in their all-wheel drive Subaru’s and Audi’s. It’s the perfect road for a hot hatch. During summer, the snow melts in the mountains to reveal the vast eucalypt forests of the Victorian High Country, the exclusive domain of real 4WDs. These vehicles are the norm along the Goulburn Valley Highway this time of year despite not being so well suited to this type of road.

Not so Olaf, our Toyota Landcruiser 200. It seems to defy the laws of physics as it trundles along occasionally challenging the speed limit, eating up hills like they weren’t there and negotiating corners faster than a 2,800kg of BHP’s finest should be able to. I was really enjoying the drive home, revelling in the Cruiser’s silky smooth twin turbo V8 as it dispatched the miles behind us. Olaf had recently ticked over 30,000km and I started to reflect on just how good this car is and how much better it seems to get as time goes by.

Olaf at Woods Point, Victoria. Luckily we didn't need to fill up here...!
First…a bit of a history lesson. I never liked Landsruisers and their owners annoyed me. I hated the way they seemed to make 4wding look easy. Then there was their smugness when I had to call on one of them to get me out of a bog or other situation where I lacked forward momentum. Their ‘generosity’ was always accompanied with the same mantra; “Why don’t you just buy yourself a Landcruiser?” It was like nails down a chalk-board. The fact of the matter was that I secretly coveted my neighbours’ cruisers but steadfastly refused to succumb to the temtation. I swore I would never buy one.

That was up until February 2015 when we ordered our new caravan. A 3,500kg town house on wheels. Our hand was forced into buying a new 4wd to tow it and our choices were few. On the list was the 200 series Landcruiser and as much as I wanted to continue by love/hate relationship with them, there was no denying it was the car for us. When we went for our test drive, I hoped it would be awful or that Kylie would find it too big for her to drive every day. None of that eventuated and today the prejudice was well and truly put to the past. We love Olaf and for good reason.

First time taking the rig Off Road...! The cruiser did it with ease.
You see, unless you buy an American pick-up truck, there really are few options for a good, solid, full size 4WD towing vehicle and when you take into account the availability of service centres around the country, Toyota is as good as it gets and a long way better than all the alternatives. Nissan had a new Patrol on the market with a big V8 petrol engine which, by all accounts, is an awesome vehicle.  Regardless, having experienced owning a petrol V8 4wd in the past, it would take a lot of convincing to get me to buy another one. The fuel use can be scary.

The Cruiser’s engine is magic and it seems to have loosened up considerably since we first got it. It feels smoother and more willing to rev. At first, I thought Toyota had got the transmission all wrong but now that I’ve driven it and gotten used to it, I reckon Toyota knew exactly what they were doing. You very rarely find yourself in the wrong gear. If you do, all it takes is a slight depression of the loud pedal and it kicks down a cog and rockets on in a satisfying swell of torque.

The Toyota steel bullbar has actually turned out to be pretty good. I reckon its the best looking one for this series.
What continually amazes me is just how economic the Cruiser is. We don’t drive it like we’ve stolen it but we don’t baby it either. This trip, in particular, I drove a little more enthusiastically than I might otherwise and it still returned an average of 11.4l/100ks. Granted this is not as good as some of the other modern 4wds but for a big V8, this is outstanding. It challenges the fuel economy of my old 2.5l Discovery and is way better than our 3.0 Patrol…!

Overtaking on a road like the Goulburn is when you really appreciate the V8. Sink the boot in and the motor responds with a satisfying shove in the kidneys accompanied by a nice soundtrack. It feels unstoppable. Unrelenting. Awesome.

Putting the big van on the back changes the equation somewhat but the Cruiser takes this in its stride. The long travel accelerator requires a decent stomp to get the whole rig moving, but it does get going much better that you might expect. It will cruise all day at the speed limit with the van on the back and, apart from the shorter distances between fuel stops, it’s easy to forget the caravan is there.

We’ve done pretty much all the mods we intend to do for the time being. Dual battery system, UHF radio, drawer system, power outlets in the rear, tire pressure monitoring system, Scanguage, rear view camera and driving lights. The Lovell’s GVM upgrade suspension has proved to be a wise decision. Surprisingly, I reckon the Toyota steel bull bar is the best looking of all the alternatives. Once the warranty has run out we plan to up the performance a bit with a modified exhaust and performance chip. We did the same thing to our Patrol and the results of that were amazing.

Other mods we have planned are a catch can and perhaps a secondary fuel filter.  For now, Olaf is doing the job extremely well. It’s powerful, comfortable, reliable, and reasonably economic to run plus it tows like a dream. You can’t really ask for much more…!

The PomPonazzi paint coating looks amazing and actually does provide real protection.

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Roadstar Safari Tamer

Custom Awning Shade

Nissan Patrol CRD

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Christmas competition time

Thanks to Redarc, the Australian manufacturer of portable, vehicular power solutions, we have 2 x Tow Pro Elite electronic brake controllers to give away.

To win, just like our Facebook page, if you haven’t done so already, and reply to the post about this compete in 20 words or less why you want or need a Tow Pro Elite brake controller.

The entry judged the most original will win one and the entry with the funniest answer will win the other.

Entries close 9pm, 1 January 2017 and the winners announced the next day.

For more information about the Redarc Tow Pro Elite, visit their website.

Good luck and Merry Christmas.

 

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Last Minute Christmas Gift Ideas

With less than a week to Christmas, are you struggling with some last minute gift ideas?  Or are you being asked for gift ideas for yourself and you’re struggling to come up with suggestions that are family budget friendly?  Well here’s a few ideas that may fit the bill especially as they are very much aimed at the caravanner or camper.

Everyone who is into camping in any way will always appreciate a good torch as a present and the Arlec 2-In-1 Utility Torch with 180 Lumen Flood Light and 3 LED Spotlight is sure to please. I got one yesterday and I am completely amazed at how good it is.  The torch light is not too bright but it’s certainly useable.  The work light however is outstanding.  It will easily flood an area of 25 square meters with useful light.   It has a convenient hook for hanging the light as well as a magnet that can attach to most metal surfaces.  Considering it uses just 3 AAA batteries, which are included for a change, it is amazing.  Bunnings sell them for less than $10.  I don’t think you can buy more light for less money.

The Arlec 2-In-1 Utility Torch is a ripper.

While on the subject of torches, how many times have you gone to get the torch from your glovebox, gone to switch it on and….nothing.  The batteries are flat.  Happens more times that we care to admit.  I once had a very expensive torch that killed the batteries and they swelled up so much, I couldn’t get them out again and had to throw the thing away.  So now I carry a couple of wind up or dynamo powered torches.  These are quite brilliant.  Wind the handle a few times and you have good emergency lighting.  There are literally hundreds available from most hardware and camping stores and they can be bought for less than $20. Some even have a radio in them making them more useful in an emergency.

If I had to name one task with the van that I hate, it would be filling up the water tanks.  The filler constantly backpressures unless you keep the flow rate so low that it take ½ hour to fill one tank.  We have 3 on the Roadstar.  Not much fun at all.  But one of these hose adaptors that fit down the neck of the filler changes all that.  No more hassles or an unwanted drenching.  You could make one yourself from a length of black irrigation hose and a few connections or you can buy one ready made from a RV accessories store.  Either way, you’ll make someone happy for less than $20.

The recent wet weather across the country has resulted in a proliferation of insects including flies.  Some of the warmer areas of the country are scourged with plagues of the sticky bugs.  If you know of someone who is about to travel to inland Australia, they may appreciate a pair of personal fly nets that fit over their hats and stop flies attaching their face.  These are very cheap and widely available from camping and outdoor stores.

A collapsible kettle. Just one of the many such items available from www.CaravanRVCamping.com.au

Caravanners are always struggling to find space to store everything as well as save weight where possible.  Well you can help that special someone with their quest by getting them one of the many collapsible camping accessories.  They are normally made from silicon and the array of available utensils and cookware is just amazing.  Kettles, food bowels, even wash up sinks can be found in a collapsible silicon product.  Most are relatively cheap and available from camping and variety stores everywhere.

A few months ago there was a big recall on portable gas cooktops that used cheap gas canisters for fuel.  Well, many of us had to destroy the ones we had and, if any of your family members are like me, they may not have replaced them with a newer safe version. They are now on the market again and a single burner unit sells for about $25 and the double burner models are anything up to about $50.  These cooktops are so convenient and very cheap to run.  They make a great Christmas present.

Most caravans will have a hot water system and the majority will have a sacrificial anode in the tank.  I reckon these are the worst design things ever as the anode’s don’t seem to last very long.  With us all going on holidays after Christmas, one of the items that needs to be checked is the anode and bets are it will need replacing.  Fortunately they are extremely cheap and can be purchased from just about any caravan accessory store for less than about $20.  May seem like a strange gift but I’ll bet its appreciated when the time comes.

A good selection of spare parts and tools to handle most emergencies.

There are some items that everyone should store in the caravan or camper for dealing with emergency repairs.  Things like fuses, wire ties, gaffer tape, hose clamps and assorted electrical connectors are always needed so why not put together a small emergency kit as a gift.  You can get most of the items from places like the the Reject shop.  You should be able to make a pretty comprehensive kit for less than $20.

One of the best things we ever bought for our Webber BBQ is a set of silicon BBQ mats.  They transformed the Baby Q for us and they are pretty cheaply available from specialist BBQ outlets or online.   If you know someone who has one of these, they will thank you for ever if you get them a set of these mats.

If none of these gift ideas appeal in any way, you can always resort to a gift card.  I know I would appreciate one for stores like BCF or Bunnings.  Even one for iTunes or Google Play Store will be appreciated by the caravanner or camper in your family.

Hopefully these gift ideas have helped solved some of your gift buying dilemmas this Christmas.

Safe Travels…!


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10 Reasons to Keep a Spare iPhone in Your Caravan

Have you got an old smartphone or two lying around and you’re wondering what to do with them? Well…if you’re like Kylie and I, and you love upgrading to the latest gadgets, you’ve probably got at least one sitting in a drawer in your home. I know I find it very difficult to just get rid of a device that once cost me a lot of money. So I started to think about what use could an old, unused smartphone be to the average caravanner? Well…as it turns out, there’s quite a lot of functions a spare smartphone can be used for especially for RV use and, when compared to purchasing individual hardware for each specific task, you could end up saving yourself a substantial amount of money.

Here we look at just 10 useful apps that we have found that you can install on a spare iPhone or similar device that will be useful for caravanning and camper travel.

maxresdefault1. GPS Tracking Device. Pretty much every iPhone and most other brands of smartphones, have a built in GPS function. Normally this is used for mapping and navigation but it is also used as a means to locate a lost or stolen iPhone using the Find my Phone application. This comes standard with iOS and basically allows you to view the location of any other iOS device you own using the internal GPS. Android phones have a similar app. The location is displayed on a map and, from what I have found, it is extremely accurate. By placing an old iPhone in your caravan or camper and having it connected to a constant 12v source, it can act as a GPS locator in the event your RV is stolen. Where ever the caravan goes, the phone will go. Obviously you will need to install a separate SIM card for the phone to work. I found that Vodafone offer a ‘pay as you go’ or prepaid account that has a validity period of 12 months for any credit you put on the card. This means you can put a minimum of $10 on the account and this will last you a year or until you run out of data credit. A dedicated GPS tracking device can cost anywhere between $300 and $1,000 dollars depending on functionality so the savings on this function alone justify keeping a spare phone in your van.
2. Video Surveillance Camera. If you have a look on the App Store, you will find a variety of video surveillance applications that turn a spare mobile phone equipped with a camera into an IP camera that can be accessed remotely from another smartphone. Some apps like Surveillance Pro allow 2 way video and audio communications. If you travel with dogs and, for whatever reason, you need to leave them in your van for a short period of time, you can monitor them and ensure they are OK and not barking. You could also place the phone in a window to keep an eye on your campsite. The uses for this are endless. Installing a similar dedicated IP camera could cost upwards of $150.
logo_big3. Caravan Levelling Device. Another unique feature of the iPhone is the inbuilt position and accelerometer sensors that are used to , among other things, detect the movement and orientation of the phone itself. It allows the screen to rotate between portrait and landscape modes automatically or for applications like the digital spirit level. Now some enterprising people have come up with an app that sends this positional data to another smartphone remotely allowing the spare phone in the van or camper to tell the driver when it is level. The app is called StayLevel. It’s a brilliant system that allows you to park your van in the most level position on a campsite before unhitching it from the tow vehicle. It should avoid one of the most common causes of arguments between couples and prevent you from rolling out of an uneven bed at night…! Again, there are devices that can be purchased for this very purpose that cost upwards of $350.
4. Remote Battery Monitor. Just about every modern caravan or camper has a 12v electrical system of some description and monitoring the health of your batteries is key to ensuring this system delivers constant power to all of your appliances. If, like me, you rely on your 12v power system to power a cpap machine overnight, knowing your batteries are fully charged before nightfall is essential to your health. Your van will likely have an inbuilt monitor of some type but imagine how good it would be if you could have that information at your side all the time? Well now you can with the availability of several devices that connect to a smartphone via Bluetooth and display all sorts of information about the health of your batteries and the rate at which you’re using power. They are not cheap, costing around $300 but the convenience they can offer can be very helpful. You can keep the phone with you outside of the van and at a glance see what state of charge your batteries are at. If they are not getting charged sufficiently, you can move the solar panels into better sunlight or consider other methods of charging. Some apps give you the ability to set alerts to prevent running your batteries too low and causing them damage.
 bmpro-battery-check-feature-image5. Juke Box. If your caravan or camper has an inbuilt stereo system that allows the connection of a smartphone or MP3 player, you can store your favourite music on your spare iPhone and leave it in the van permanently connected to the stereo so you will always have your music with you when you travel.
6. Movies on the go. Take the above one step further and, if you have sufficient memory capacity on your phone, you can also store a selection of your favourite movies that, with the addition of an AV cable, can be connected to your TV. This saves carrying around a heap of DVDs or a separate portable hard drive.
7. Walkie Talkie. How many of us love watching others trying to back their campers and vans into a tight spot and have a giggle at the antics and agreements that inventively ensue. Sadly we do and often we have offered these poor souls the use of our portable UHF radio. I’ve often wondered why people don’t have one of these useful tools for assisting with this task. Well, there is a great feature on all smartphones called push to talk and it allows phones to communicate with each other without using valuable data or phone credit turning your phones into walkie talkies. Just do a search on ‘push to talk’ apps on the Appstore. It could save you $50 or more on a dedicated portable radio.
8. Night Light/Alarm Clock. You can spend hours trolling through all the night light apps on the app store. There are literally hundreds. Some will have sound activation, others will have various functions like a night clock that is sound activated. There are probably more out there with features you may not have ever contemplated. Either way, making use of your spare iPhone as a night light and a bedside alarm clock can be very helpful.
screen568x5689. Children’s entertainment. We don’t have children but on occasion we may have people visit is when were in the caravan and they may bring their kids along. If it’s raining and there is not much for them to do , it may be handy to have a spare iPhone around loaded with a selection of games to keep them entertained without lending them your actual mobile phone. Kids have a habit of destroying things from time to time so if they do break your spare phone, it won’t be such a hardship.
10. Netflix Box. Netflix, if you haven’t heard about it, is an on-demand online TV streaming service that costs a fraction of traditional pay TV subscriptions. You can use the Netflix app on your smartphone to stream TV to a normal television using a device like the Google Chromecast. By installing the Netflix app on your spare phone you will always have a player handy in your RV and it will allow you to use your personal mobile phone for other applications. I wouldn’t recommend using a smartphone for Netflix unless you were at a caravan park with free WiFi access available.

So there you have it. Ten very practical uses for a spare smartphone that you can keep in your caravan or camper that can make life on the road just that little bit easier.

Safe Travels

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Aussie Traveller Rafter DIY Installation.

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Aussie Traveller Rafters add much needed support to the awning, preventing flapping and ensuring water doesn’t pool when it rains.

Today I had a bit of spare time to install a set of Aussie Traveller Awning Rafters. Yes….I did it myself.

I’m reasonably handy with most DIY projects however the prospect of drilling holes into our near new caravan was not a task I was looking forward to. One stuffed up measurement and I could have ended up with a hole or two where they shouldn’t be.

There’s a golden rule in any DIY project; measure twice, drill once. It’s a good mantra to have especially with this install.

img_5560Step 1: Measure out the rafter positions. Depending on the number of rafters you need to install, you need to measure out where they will go. I was installing 2 rafters so I needed two equal distant spaces. I measured from the edge of the awning material itself as this correlates back to the roller perfectly ensuring both ends line up.

img_5559Step 2: Screw in the bracket. The instructions say that you need to ensure the bracket is about 2.5cm lower than the awning itself. I found that this was not so critical and I just screwed my brackets into the metal strip that secures the awning itself. I figured the panel behind it had already been drilled into so it was a safe bet that I could drill in line with the rivets without hitting any wires. If you’re not sure, drill your holes very slowly so as to control the drill when it reaches the inside edge of the panel. The kit came with wood screws but given I was screwing into metal, I used my own self drilling sheet metal screws. I drilled pilot holes first just to be sure.

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Make sure the drill bit is just big enough for the rafter to fit into. You want a snug fit as any movement will expand the hole and risk it rattling in the wind.

Step 3: Drill the holes in the roller. Before drilling the holes, install the rafter at the van wall end and check to see the place you’ve market for the hole in the roller lines up. Again, the instructions show the holes being drilled above the grove where the shade slips in. This was not going to work for us so I just ensured the awning was completely unrolled and drilled the hole in the same approximate position.

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I could have probably mounted the bracket a bit higher but this is fine. There’s plenty of metal in there for the screws to get a good bite and a secure fitting.
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The roller end of the awning.

That’s it. Job done. It really is a simple install anyone can do. We’re expecting some rain and wind tonight so it will be interesting to see how it holds up. So far it feels very solid and with the assistance of ratchet strap tie downs, I expect it will survive pretty severe conditions.

Safe travels

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Make Better Use of your Webber Baby Q

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This image shows how to fit the silicon mat to your Webber. Leave a gap at the long edges to allow heat circulation as well as allowing fat to drain away.

Everywhere we have travelled we have seen many campers using a Webber BBQ, usually the Baby Q. It seems to be the perfect size for portability as well as being capable of cooking a sufficient quantity of food for two to four people.  So when we ordered the new van, we opted to fit a Baby Q on a slide out in the tunnel boot.

This has proved to be an excellent choice however I have struggled a bit with it to cook basic meals like bacon and eggs or potato chips and chopped onions. These are not really suitable for cooking on an open grill and the half hot plate made by Webber is too small to be very useful.

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We like chopped onion and potatoes cooked on the BBQ and the silicon mat allows us to do this to perfection. Couldn’t be easier…!

To solve this, we purchased a set of silicon bbq mats and these have proven to be the perfect solution. They have transformed the Webber into an every day cooking appliance.

So now, in addition to perfect roasts and char grilled steaks, we can now cook bacon and eggs with ease.

To start you off here’s my method for cooking perfect bacon and eggs. Click here.

The silicon matts can be purchased from eBay or any variety store that sells BBQ accessories.

Enjoy…!

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Is the SLR Camera Obselete?

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Has the smartphone killed the SLR camera…?

I love photography and I especially love taking photos of the beautiful places we visit on our travels. For years I’ve carried a digital SLR camera with me along with an assortment of lenses and filters. It has allowed me to take some truely spectacular photos. But this comes at a price. The camera and all its accessories need a bag big enough to carry all the gear and protect it from the elements. It can also be quite fiddly changing lenses and keeping the dust out in the process.  It’s not really suited for impromptu photos. Using an SLR camera is about taking time to be creative to capture the true essence of the subject.

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The filters and editing software on many smartphones can turn an average image into something quite unique and visually stunning.

For those random moments that happen every day, the camera on my smartphone is much more usable and available when the opportunity presents itself. The images cannot be compared to those from the SLR, but they are more than adequate for sharing on social media or even publishing on the web. Add to that the sofisicated image editing software that comes standard with iOS or Android and you really do need to ask if the smartphone camera is all that we need for capturing our holiday snaps.

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Aerial photos taken from a drone are absolutely spectacular.

Now, a new camera technology is becoming popular. Drones with digital cameras onboard allow us to take photos from an entirely different perspective. I’ve been experimenting with our Parrot drone and the results are nothing short of spectacular. The problem with the drone is its not really suitable for every occasion.  You can’t just launch the drone anywhere. Trees, weather and other obstacles can make flight difficult.

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This image would only be possible with a SLR camera fitted with a powerful telephoto lense.

So what camera or cameras should we chose to take with us on our travels. Well, that’s not an easy question to answer. For many, the smartphone can pretty much take any photo we would want. For others, the flexibility of interchangeable lenses and exposure control allow us to exercise our creativity more than a smartphone can. A drone might be an added level of complexity for only the real dedicated photographer chasing a truely unique perspective.

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The panorama mode on the smartphone camera can easily produce some dramatic images like this storm cloud.

If your thinking about extending your photography beyond your smartphone, we’ve take a deeper look at what can be achieved with all three types of cameras. You can read the article here.

So, to answer the original question, is the SLR camera dead? Well that’s up to the individual to decide what they want from their holiday photographs. For me, I would not be without my SLR camera.

Safe travels…

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New BOS 370 Jockey Wheel Fitted to Olaf

There’s one thing that has always annoyed me about our caravans and campers; the jockey wheel.

I have not been able to find a system that I have completely happy with. The camper’s we’ve had used the swing away variety but I’ve found the pivot mechanism to be a weak point resulting in bending of the wheel. Both caravans have had the removable unit that is attached using 2 screw clamps positioned in the middle of the A frame. These are awkward to get to and the clamps are damn fiddly. Then you have the problem of where to store the jockey wheel when you’re on the road. I never really found a good spot to store it where it wasn’t in the way of other stuff. What I wanted was a jockey wheel that I could leave in the holder but could retract it so it was is out of the way when travelling. Well I’m glad to report I have found such a device.

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It’s called the BOS 370 Jockey Wheel and it is absolutely brilliant. It uses a geared winding mechanism to raise and lower the shaft. The ends are interchangeable depending on what unit you buy. I went with the straight base plate instead of the traditional wheel as the team at BOS advised that it is not really useful for a huge van like ours. You can also attach extensions to the base plate in order to cater for uneven sites. The mechanism can be operated by either the hand winder or using an ordinary clutched battery drill, the later make raising and lowering your caravan a breeze.

Best of all, once the base plate and any extensions have been removed using the quick release cotter pins, the shaft can be fully retracted sufficiently to allow the unit to remain in place. No need to remove it from the clamps. To me, this is the best part of the system.

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We’ll be giving the BOS unit a good workout shortly on our up and coming trip to Stradbroke Island so we’ll do a complete review later. For now, if you’re a bit frustrated with your existing jockey wheel, the BOS370 may be worth a look.

Safe Travels

BOS Stabiliser Legs Review

BOS Stabiliser Legs DIY Install

More products from BOS

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New additions to Olaf

With our impending trip to Stradbroke Island rapidly approaching, I thought it was about time I got busy with some additions to our Landcruiser, Olaf.

First off was the installation of a ScanGuage to monitor Olaf’s vital information like transmission temperature and fuel use.

13775476_1047165028701492_3516954095091178221_nNext was to put some 12v power outlets in the rear storage area so we can run our fridge and other accessories.

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As with anything we do to Olaf, Kylie doesn’t want it to look like the DeLorean from the movie Back to the Future.  She wants everything to look stock and no holes drilled in the trim.  Fortunately I managed to do this with both which made my life a lot easier.

I’m pretty happy with the results.  More detailed notes on the installations can be found at the links below.

Safe travels.

ScanGauge Installation and Review

12v Power Board for Rear Storage System

 

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Staying warm this Winter

snowWinter has arrived and, if the first few days are any indication, we could be in for a chilly three months.  Many will likely head off to the warmer northern parts of the country to escape the cold weather but some of us are not quite so fortunate.  That said, Victoria, Tasmania, SA and the southern parts of WA are beautiful this time of year so we should make the effort to see our own backyard if we can.  Heating our campers and caravans during these trips can make the difference between a bearable experience or extremely comfortable adventure.

In the article below, we look at the various options for heating the interior of our campers and vans and explain some of the dangers involved with a couple of the options.  We hope you find it useful.

Stay warm everyone…!

Heating options for Campers and Caravans 

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